Jesus a man of Integrity

Matthew 22:15-22

In an attempt to trap Jesus there was an alliance formed between the Pharisees who were strong Nationalists, supporting a Jewish nation and the Herodians, Jews supporting the Roman rule of the Herods. They visited Jesus and posed the question in verse 17 “Tell us then, what is your opinion? Is it right to pay taxes to Caesar or not? ” As you can quickly recognize, this is a loaded question because, if Jesus says “yes” the Pharisees will regard him as a supporter of Rome, and untrue to the Jewish Nation. If he says “no”, the Herodians will regard him as a traitor and have him executed. (NIV footnote 22:15-17)

Jesus turns this attempts to trap him, into a moment to teach the Pharisees and the Herodians by taking the high ground. He doesn’t advocate ignoring one or the other and gives a “yes and yes” answer in verse 21 and says ….. “Give to Caesar what is Caesar’s, and give to God what is God’s.” In short, he reminds them that there are two kingdoms. There was the kingdom of Caesar with earthly rules, where all needed to give as required, or face the consequences. Likewise, there is the Kingdom of God that is often ignored, and has its’ consequences for ignoring.  One of the reasons I feel we often ignore the kingdom of God is because, we don’t understand the consequences of ignoring the kingdom of God.  In many cases there is no immediate consequence. By avoiding immediate consequences we feel there are no consequences at all, but eventually the consequences catch up with us. However, we must all admit that as soon as the consequence of ignoring Caesar or God hits, and trouble visits out door, we run back immediately to the kingdom of God for help.

Jesus reminds both groups that as Caesar had a standard, God has a standard. In this text, both groups of men were Jews who were there very knowledgeable of the Scriptures, noting that only the Old Testament existed at that time. They were very familiar with and understood Psalm 37:4 “Delight yourself in the Lord and he will give you the desires of your heart. Does it sound familiar to you? Of course it does because it is the foundation for Jesus’ statement “So do not worry, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ For the pagans run after these things, and your heavenly Father knows you need them. But, seek first the kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well. “  Matthew 6:31-33. In other words for Christians, seeking God is the standard to all life. Seek the higher ground. Seek the “Jesus Way” first as Jesus was the representative of his Father in heaven.

The strange thing about this text is that in attempting to trap Jesus, the Pharisees and Herodians had to be complimentary. “They had to admit, however unwillingly, that Jesus was candid, faithful in speaking God’s truth, fearless before any man, whether a mob or king. “ (TIB Vol 7, pg 517-18). In Matthew 22:16, The King James Version states “… Master, we know that though art true, and teachest the way of God in truth, neither carest thou for any man; for thou regardest not the person of men”. In the same verse, The Revised Standard Version says “….’Teacher we know that you are true, and teach the way of God truthfully, and care for no man; for you do not regard the position of men. ‘…. However, I like the way the New International Version shows it in saying “….Teacher, they said, “we know you are a man of integrity and that you teach the way of God in accordance to the truth. You aren’t swayed by men, because you pay no attention to who they are….” Here, the key is “a man of integrity”.

In this passage, the English word integrity is translated from the Greek word alethes. The Greek word alethes, when it translates to the English word integrity, has five attributes or descriptions and they are True, Genuine, Reliable, Trustworthy and Valid.  A highlight of these attributes in Jesus, gives us examples of how we as Christians can strive to be “Jesus Like”.

  1. True – Jesus was true. There is nothing false about Jesus. In John 1:6-9, The Apostle John wrote about, Jesus to distinguish Jesus from John the Baptist. The Apostle said There is a man who was sent from God; his name was John. He came as a witness to testify concerning that light, so that through him all men might believe. He himself was not the light; he came only as a witness to the light. The TRUE light that gives light to every man was coming into the world. “ Who is the TRUE (non false) light? Of course it is Jesus.
  1. Genuine or Actual – Jesus is true with nothing false about him as he was the ACTUAL Son of God. John 3:16-17 “For God so loved the world that he sent his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him.” Who was the Genuine/Actual Son of God? Of Course, Jesus.
  1. Reliable – Jesus can be trusted because he is not only God’s Son but God’s agent. Jesus is reliable because his source is reliable. In John 8:26 Jesus said, “I Have much to say about judgment of you. But he who sent me is RELIABLE, and what I have heard from him I tell the world.” Who had reliable information because he had a reliable source? Of course, Jesus.
  1. Trustworthy Able to be trusted to do or provide what is needed. Who can you depend on in a time of need or a time of joy? Who is there whenever you call on his name? Of course, Jesus. Have you ever depended on Jesus and He let you down? No!
  1. Valid – Valid is the quality of being officially acceptable. Jesus is officially accepted as God because He is God. John 1:1 says “In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.” John the apostle opens his gospel with a clarification of who Jesus is. Jesus is the official, factual son of God. John said it, the Bible consistently proves it and I believe it.

Referring to Jesus as a man of integrity was meant to be a trap. But, He is a True, Genuine, Reliable, Trustworthy and Valid Jesus. With the attributes of True, Genuine, Reliable, Trustworthy and Valid, we can only reach one conclusion. Jesus on Earth, was definitely a man of integrity. The Pharisees and Herodians, in their attempts to be tricky, were more correct that they ever knew. Jesus was and had to be an earthy “man of intergrity” because, He is in fact the God of integrity. Psalm 118:29 says Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good; and his love endures forever.” The God of integrity is the source of honesty, the source of morality, the source of righteousness, the source of truthfulness and the source of sincerity. Jesus, the son of God was honest, moral, righteous, trustworthy and sincere. He was not only full of integrity, He is the God of integrity. He is the only one that Father God accepted as a “purification for our sins” (Hebrews 1:3). He is the Jesus, crucified, died, buried and arose from the dead. Jesus was a man of integrity because he is the God of integrity.

1. Edward W. Goodrick and John R Kohlenberger III, The Strongest NIV Exhaustive Concordance, Zondervan, 1993                                                                                          2.The NIV Study Bible, The Zonvervan Corporation, 1995

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How can the Word be with God and be God? John 1:1

How can the Word both be with God and be God? John 1:1

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. John 1:1 (NIV)

John is referencing us back the Genesis 1:1, In the beginning….(NIV),

John wants us to know that Jesus has always been with God from the very beginning. If we see this verse as John states it… In the Beginning was Jesus and Jesus was with God and Jesus is God…

As you study John, you will understand why his gospel starts at the beginning… unlike the other gospel Mark, Matthew and Luke. They start with the birth of Jesus or the Baptism of Jesus.

References: NIV Bible, Life Change series: John page 21.

Bible Study Notes from The Gosple of John – Lesson One

 

Overview Summary of  Lesson One

Life Changes Series by NAVPRESS (1)

Who is John?

John describes himself only as “ the disciple whom Jesus loved.” (John 13:23 plus ft.nt., 19:26, 20:2; 21:7, 20; see also 21:24).

John was  the son of Zebedee, a Fisherman (Mark 1:19-20); his mother was Salome (Mark 15: 40, Matt. 27:56).  He was the brother of James (Matt. 4: 21-22).

He was prominent in the early church but is not mentioned by name in this Gospel—which would be natural if he wrote it, but hard to explain otherwise. (NIV pg. 2177)

The book for this study is outlined simply, to give us a tour of the book of John.  The author gives the students the time to slowly get use to the author and how he (John) writes and teaches us about the gift of eternal life Jesus offers to all who believe in Him.

The study guide has work book exercises. Some important workbook exercises for this lesson were:

Outlining JOHN – One of the important guides in understanding the Bible is to identify the author’s intent in writing the book. In this study, on page 11, the author asks the student to, as you initially read the book, make a broad outline of the book by giving a title to each chapter or themes within a chapter.  Pages 11 and 12 provide assistance with a chapter/verse guide of important sections.

Question 5 on page 12 – “What do you learn about John’s intent and purpose for writing John from 20:30-31? “Jesus did many other miraculous signs in the presence of his disciples, which are not recorded in this book. But these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name.”

Four Gospels (page 14) – The group was given enough information to compare and contrast the gospel of John with the synoptic gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke by reading “Four Gospels” on pages 14-15.

  1. Life Change Series, JOHN, The Navigators, NavPress,1987
  2. Holy Bible: New International Version (NIV), Zondervan Corporation, 2002

 

 

 

 

  THE WOMAN WHO LIVED A SINFUL LIFE

Bible Study Lesson 6/25/2016 Key Scriptures: Luke 7:36-50

Supporting Scriptures: Luke 19:2-3; Romans 3:23; Is. 55:8; Rom. 6:23;

Matt. 7:1; Matt.23:2-3,13-14; Rev. 3:20; Zec.1:3; Matt. 28:19-20; John 3:16; Matt.22:37-38; John 14:23; Matt. 10:33; Prov. 3:6; Hebrews 8:12

  1. THE TITLE:

Many times in scripture the main character is named, such as Zacchaeus, a man of short stature who climbed a sycamore tree in order to see Jesus. (Luke 19:2-3). Other times, as in this lesson, no name is given. While pondering the reason why, consider this: any name would be appropriate; male or female. Romans 3:23 tells us “for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God”.

  1. HER CHARACTER:

“She was a notorious sinner, possibly a prostitute or adulteress. Rather than trying to defend what was indefensible in her life, she admitted her sin and made a spectacle of herself in a passionate display of love and gratitude.”  WOB, pg. 171.

In our humanness, we often attempt to categorize sin. For many a “LITTLE SIN” like lying is insignificant, while a “BIG SIN” such as murder is unforgiveable. In opposition to our thinking, let us look at Isaiah 55:8 “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways”, declares the Lord. We know that God hates all sin, for He tells us “the wages of sin is death…”. (Romans 6:23) Therefore, as we look at the character of the lady in this lesson; ourselves; and the many others in which we come in contact, let us remember “Do not judge, or you too will be judged”. (Matt. 7:1)

  1. HER SORROW:

“That she had offended God so grievously”. (biblegateway.com)

  1. HER JOY:

“That Jesus forgave her sins and commended her great faith and love.” (biblegateway.com)

  1. THE INVITATION:

One of the Pharisees named Simon invited Jesus into his home for dinner and Jesus went and reclined at the table. (Luke 7:36) Based on scripture, we know that the Pharisees were experts in the law. They believed in God, but not that Jesus was the Messiah. Repeatedly, they attempted to entice Jesus into saying something they could use to bring about his arrest, imprisonment and crucifixion. In regard to the Pharisees, Jesus stated “The teachers of the law and the Pharisees sit in Moses’ seat. So you must obey them and do everything they tell you. But do not do what they do, for they do not practice what they preach”. (Matt. 23:2-3). Repeatedly, he referred to them as “hypocrites”. (Matt. 23:13-14)

Initially, we don’t know why Simon extended the invitation or why Jesus accepted; we simply know that it was done. Here is something we do know in full detail, Jesus has extended an open invitation to all of us. He says, “Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with that person and they with me”. (Rev. 3:20) We can rejoice in the knowledge that God’s invitation remains open even when we err and fall into sin, if we will sincerely repent (as the woman in this lesson). Let us remember the words of the Lord in Zechariah 1:3, “Return to me”, declares the Lord Almighty, “and I will return to you”.

  1. SHARING THE GOSPEL:

A woman in town who lived a sinful life heard that Jesus was dining at Simon’s house, so she arrived uninvited with an alabaster jar filled with perfume. (Luke 7:37)

Apparently, the woman had already heard Jesus speak or at least had heard about Him. She had seen or heard of His many miracles, healings and teachings. After hearing, she responded by seeking Him out and going to where He was. Obviously, she desired to connect with Him, learn more and pay homage to Him since she brought along a gift- love offering.

As children of God, it is our responsibility to spread the good news telling others about Jesus. He commands us to “Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you.” (Matt. 28:19-20)

Like the woman in our lesson, after hearing about Jesus our desire should be to make that connection with Him. We can rest assured that “God desires a continuing love relationship with us that is real and personal”. (Experiencing God; Henry and Richard Blackaby; pg. 52 2007).  In Matthew 22:37-38, Jesus says “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind. This is the first and the greatest commandment.”  While requiring our love, remember that God first demonstrated His love for us in that “…..He gave His one and only son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life”. (John 3:16)  How appropriate is that age-old childhood song: “Jesus loves me this I know, for the bible tells me so”.

  1. WE SHOULD DEMONSTRATE OUR LOVE FOR JESUS OPENLY!

After entering Simon’s home, the woman stood behind Jesus at His feet weeping; wet His feet with her tears; wiped them with her hair; kissed them and poured perfume on them. (Luke7:38). Her love for Jesus was shown through her humility (the washing of His feet); tears (outward display of love and devotion); and unselfish giving (the alabaster jar filled with  perfume). Scripture doesn’t indicate that she ever spoke a word, but her love and devotion was evident.

As believers, we should demonstrate our love for Jesus openly by living righteously and loving others as He commands. He tells us in John 14:23 “anyone who loves me will obey my teaching”.  He further states in Matthew 10:33, that, if we deny Him before men, He will deny us before His Father.

  1. HATERS WILL HATE

When Simon saw what the woman was doing, his mind went straight to the negative. He thought to himself, “If Jesus is a prophet he would know that the woman touching him is a sinner”. (Luke 7:39)  Now Simon reveals his true character and doubt of who Jesus is. How quickly he was ready to judge, placing himself above the woman, as though he was not also a sinner. Additionally, he seemingly places himself above Jesus, believing that he knows more because he recognizes the woman as a sinner while Jesus does not.

  1. IGNORE STUMBLING BLOCKS

Jesus knew Simon’s thoughts and responded by explaining a parable about two men who owed a debt, one 500 denarii and the other 50. Neither man could repay the moneylender, so he forgave both debts.  Jesus then asked the question, which of the debtors would love the most (be the most grateful). Simon answered the one who owed the most and Jesus replied that he was correct. (Luke 7:43-44)

The parable was meant to teach a lesson. Both Simon and the woman owed a debt that could never repay. Consider this summarization from Bible Gateway: “Though Simon’s sin was less obvious, it was the more dangerous. He was like a man who was following a map he was certain would lead to heaven—but when heaven came down and walked into his house, he didn’t even know it. The woman on the other hand, realized just how lost she had been. Forgiven much, she loved much. She found heaven at the feet of Jesus.”

Jesus went on to point out all the expected amenities Simon had failed to offer as a proper host, such as water to clean His feet; a welcoming kiss; or oil for His head. The woman, however, had done all these acts of love by washing His feet, kissing them and anointing them with oil. (Luke 7:44-46)

In our daily lives, there will be stumbling blocks. There will people who question our commitment to God; criticize our actions; intentionally place obstacles in our way, and even slander our name and more. Remember that God is omniscience, omnipresent and omnipotent.  Trust completely in Him, stand firmly on His promises and “in all thy ways acknowledge Him and He shall direct thy paths”. (Prov.3:6)

  1. JESUS RESPONDS TO OUR FAITH

Jesus supports the woman and says to Simon, “Therefore I tell you, her many sins have been forgiven—as her great love has shown”. (Luke7:47). He also says directly to the woman, “Your sins are forgiven”. (Luke 7:48)

We know that the woman was not saved because of her actions or the expensive perfume, for it is “not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us”. (Titus 3:5) Jesus makes it perfectly clear in Luke7:50 when he says to The Woman Who Has Lived A Sinful Life, “Your faith has saved you; go in peace”.

  1. STANDING ON THE WORD

God has promised, “For I will forgive their wickedness and remember their sins no more”. (Hebrews 8:12)  “This story isn’t included in scripture just so we can see the forgiveness given to one sinful woman, it is included so that we can know that no matter how sinful, how broken, how entrenched in error we might be, forgiveness is available if only we seek it in faith—he’s promised.”  biblegateway.com/devotionals/women of the bible/2014/09/29.

Bibliography:

Holy Bible, New International Version, (NIV) Study Bible, Copyright 1985, Zondervan Corporation

Women of the Bible, 52 Bible Studies for Individuals and Groups, Copyright 1999,2002 by Ann Spangler and Jean Syswerda; Zondervan

Experiencing God, Knowing and Doing the Will of God, Henry and Richard Blackaby, Claude King; Copyright 2007, Reprinted 2015

biblegateway.com/devotionals/women-of-the-bible/2014/09/29

 

 

Joanna – 10 Points for Bible Study on 5/14/2016

1. Joanna – her name means “T he Lord Gives Graciously” and in this story Joanna who experienced gracious healing at Jesus’ hands responded by giving herself totally, supporting his ministry and following him wherever he went. WOB p. 184

2. A woman of high rank in Herod’s court.  She was married to Cuza, the manager of Herod’s household.

a. In Clarke’s commentary steward is used instead of manager and signifies the overseer of Herod’s domestic affairs.   http://biblehub.com/commentaries/clarke/luke/8.htm

b. In Matthew Henry’s commentary it was debated whether Joanna was a widow and after her husband’s death was left with good financial means to support the ministry of Jesus Christ. Or if her husband Cuza had received the gospel and was wiling to have his wife be a “hearer of Christ and a contributor to him”.  http://biblehub.com/commentaries/mhcw/luke/8.htm

3. Joanna’s background was that of a wife of a high ranking staffer in the court of Herod, Herod Antipas, the son of Herod the Great, the tetrarch (govenor) of Galilee. In our W.O.B.studies of Herodias and Salome, we learned of this devious mother and shameless daughter who plotted along with Herod in the death of John the Baptist.                    Matthew 14:1-12

4. Luke 23:7-12  Scripture describes more background on Herod’s court and his treatment of Jesus Christ after the Last Supper and the subsequent arrest of our Lord. Jesus was interrogated by Herod after being sent to him by Pilate.  Pilate did not want to handle this case of Jesus and pushed him off onto Herod. Before sending Jesus back to Pilate, Herod attempted to humiliate and degrade him.

5. Accompanied by his disciples and the women who supported him, Jesus preached throughout every city and village of Galilee.  Matthew Henry (in the same commentary mentioned above) called Jesus an itinerant preacher,  a judge traveling his circuit, going through every city setting an example for his disciples. “They must traverse the nations of the earth, as he did the cities of Israel.      http://biblehub.com/commentaries/mhcw/luke/8.htm

6. Joanna, along with Mary Magdalene, Sisanna and other women who names are not mentioned here, ministered and supported Jesus and his ministry. These women had been healed by Jesus  of various illnesses, some with evil spirits and diseases. We know that Jesus freed Mary Magdalene of seven demons but scripture does not reveal what affliction was upon Joanna. We know that she was a patient of Jesus as others were that we have studied and that are offered in scripture (See W.O.B. pg 185). A patient offered grace who was healed by Jesus.

7. These women supported Jesus using their own means. After being healed they were possibly compelled by gratitude to serve him and his disciples. As we learned in the story of the Widow with Two Coins, we must give all we have willingly and lovingly to the Lord because what we give can never compare to what he gave and continues to give to us.These women knew this; they were the recipients of his grace and mercy and chose to support him financially and follow him wherever he went. Mark 12:43-44

Luke 24:1-11

8. Joanna and the other women who ministered to Jesus while alive, showed respect and homage to him by bringing prepared spices to his grave site.

9. On this 3rd day after Jesus’ death on the cross, the women were confronted at the grave site by 2 angels who reported that Jesus was risen from the dead.  They were reminded that Jesus had spoken these words, “The Son of Man must be delivered over to the hands of sinners, be crucified and on the third day be raised again.” Luke 24:7

10. Then they remembered his words. They were: Mary Magdalene, Joanna, Mary the mother of James and the other women who had supported Jesus and his ministry.  They were the first to see the empty tomb, to hear that Jesus was not there and to be reminded of Jesus’ words that he would rise. When they came to tell the 11 Disciples, they were not believed as the disciples thought the words of the women  were nonsense. They too would come to believe as they too were reminded of Jesus’ own words, some from Jesus himself.

 

RESOURCES:

Women of the Bible: 52 Bible Studies for Individuals and Groups; Jean E. Syswerda; Zondervan, 2002

NIV Study  Bible; Zondervan

Clarke’s Commentary; http://biblehub.com/commentaries/clarke/luke/8.htm

Matthew Henry’s Commentary; http://biblehub.com/commentaries/mhcw/luke/8.htm

 

 

The Woman with the Issue of Blood – 12 Study Points

Bible Study Lesson 04/30/2016

Key Scriptures:  Matthew 9:20-22, Mark 5:25-34, Luke 8:43-48

Introduction:

All three synoptic Gospels record the encounter of Jesus and the unnamed woman with the issue of blood. All three mention the length of time during which she had been suffering. Eusebius records a tradition that she was a Gentile, a native of Caesarea Philippi. This disease was a chronic hemorrhage, for which she had found no relief from the physicians. Lightfoot, in his ‘Horae Hebraicae,’ gives a list of the remedies applied in such cases, which seem quite sufficient to account for Mark’s statement that she was nothing bettered, but rather grew worse. Luke, himself a physician, says that she “had spent all her living upon physicians, and could not be healed of any.” (Pulpit commentary)

  1. Her Character and Her Dilemma: We don’t know her name, but we do know her situation. We don’t know all the intricate details about her resources, but we do know her need. Her world was midnight black.  Grope in-the-dark and hope-for-help black. 1She was a bruised reed.

2. [1] The Hebrew children would often go down by the riverside to play. There was where the reeds grew. One of the things these reeds were useful for was that they made good flutes. So the children would cut them down, hollow them out and make flutes out of them. The riverbank would be full of these reeds, and many of them were less than perfect. If they came across one that was cracked or bruised, they would break it in half and toss it away. After all, they needed reeds of a certain quality in order to make a flute that would play well. Cracked or bruised reeds were worthless. Bruised reeds can easily be seen as symbols of people… in the eyes of the people that inhabited her world. She was bruised reed.

3. Mark 5:25 discharge of blood: The woman’s condition was not only physically debilitating, but it disqualified her from marriage ( 20:18) as well as religious life in general (Lev. 15:25–33)

4. The woman with prolonged menstruation suffered for 12 years from being ritually unclean. This meant she was unable to live a normal life, and was in a sense dead to the people around her.

5. Strictly speaking, she should not have been among   other people. According to the laws of ritual purity, she should have been at home during her menstrual period, living quietly (see Leviticus 15:19-31).

6. But the woman in this story was not healthy. Her menstrual flow had lasted twelve years, so the purity laws had become an impossible burden for her. She could not go out, she could not touch members of her family, she could not enjoy a normal life, and she was constantly debilitated.

 7. She was a woman of faith: (Mark 5:27-28) She could not throw herself, therefore, at the feet of Christ and state her complaint. Her modesty, humility, uncleanness and pressure of the crowd made close contact nearly impossible, hence her eagerness to touch in some unnoticed way the hem of His garment.                                                                  

8. This poor lady had sought all kinds of medical care and the doctors were no help: (Mark 5:26) William Barclay says in his commentary, that “the Talmud gives no fewer than eleven cures” for such an illness. Can you imagine, eleven different treatments … no doubt she had tried all of them. Even the illegitimate ones such as carrying the ashes of an ostrich egg in a linen cloth. But when you’re desperate for a cure, when you’re long overdue for some relief… anything to make you whole again…. Yes you might even consider hollow superstitions. She “had spent all she had”. So desperate was she for some kind of cure she kept throwing good money after bad. The money had finally run out and now to add insult to injury she has to deal with financial strain dumped on top of physical strain.

9. A Risky Decision: By the time she gets to Jesus, He’s busy and surrounded by a crowd of people.  Jarius, the most important man in the community, had summoned him to help his daughter and Jesus was in route.  Her window of opportunity was closing quickly and what little hope she had was fading. This woman is down to her last prayer and she is about to pray it.  What are the odds that Jesus will interrupt an urgent mission with an important official to help her?  Very few. But twelve years is a long time and what are the odds that she will survive if she doesn’t take a chance? Fewer still. Her back was up against the wall and against all odds… she steps out on faith and takes a chance. This is how the Amplified Bible describes the incident: Scripture says that she had heard the reports about Jesus and verses 27 & 28 state, “She slipped in from behind and touched his robe. She was thinking to herself, “If I can put a finger on his robe, I can get well.” It was a risky decision. You should know this morning that exercising Faith means you must be willing to take some risk. To touch Jesus she had to touch the people.  To get to Jesus she had to get pass the roadblocks. She had to get pass the possibility of rebuke, she had to get pass the possibility of being recognized. But what choice does she have? Our lady of faith is flat broke, she doesn’t have any clout like Jarius, she doesn’t have any friends, and she doesn’t have any solutions. All she has is a premonition, an intuitive feeling that Jesus can help her and a high hope that he will.

10. She Was Cured After Many Failures. What this poor woman really endured at the hands of the medical men of the time is left to the imagination. Where men failed, Christ succeeded. Down the ages men and women which no agency could reclaim have been restored by Christ. What is not possible with men is blessedly possible with God. Her disease was of long standing yet she was swiftly healed, for as soon as she touched the hem of His garment, “straight-way the fountain of her blood was dried up.” If a person suffers for a while from a complaint and seeks no medical advice, but in the end goes to the doctor, he invariably says, “You should have come to me sooner.” But it is the glory of Christ that He can heal those who come late to Him.

11. She Acknowledged Receipt of the Benefit Bestowed: As soon as the woman touched Christ’s garment, He felt that “virtue had gone out of Him,” and turned about and said, “Who touched me?” The disciples mildly rebuked Jesus by saying, “Thou seest the multitude thronging thee, and sayest thou, Who touched me?” Perhaps her touch had been unnoticed by the eyes of those around, and she must have been one of many who touched the Master that day as he proceeded on His errand of love, but a touch of faith could not be hidden from Him. Quickly the Physician saw the patient and trembling with self-consciousness but too glad and grateful to falter, she confessed to her touch of His robe. “She told him all the truth.” She experienced that open confession is good for the soul. What a glow of gratitude her countenance must have had, as she publicly stated that her burden for twelve years had rolled away!

12. She Was Commended for Her Faith: The crowd who listened to her confession also heard the Savior’s benediction, “Daughter, be of good comfort; thy faith hath saved thee; go in peace.” As a true daughter of Abraham (Luke 13:16), her faith is crowned by the Master. Hers was not faith without a touch, or a touch without faith. Believing, she appropriated and was healed. “Daughter,” was an endearing term for Jesus to use. Some tender insight of His own must have prompted Him to use it. As Theron Brown puts it so beautifully— The restored sufferer would never forget the friendly benignity that assailed her with one indulgent epithet or the sympathy in that endearing term by which the Messiah of Israel recognized her as His own…. She cherished her debt to the Man of Galilee.

 

The Widow with Two Coins – 10 Points for Bible Study

  1. The Temple Treasury located in the court of women, contained 13 trumpet-shaped receptacles for contributions brought by worshipers. Key Scriptures & NIV Study Note- Mark 12:41
  2. The widow, though extremely poor is described as one of the most greathearted people in the Bible. She dropped two copper coins,  worth less than a penny. into the temple treasury. Key Scriptures & NIV Study Notes, W.O.B. pg 205
  3. Jesus had earlier cleansed the temple of money changers (those who changed other coins to Jewish shekels) as he opposed the buying and selling inside of the temple. Matthew 21:12-13. W.O.B. pg 206
  4. The teachings of Jesus is an emphasis in the book of Mark. Jesus models a lesson of giving  in this display by the widow for his disciples. Mark 12:43 “Calling his disciples to him…”; NIV Introduction to Mark
  5. The widow gave more than the rest and put in all she had willingly and lovingly.  Mark 12:43-44.  Willingness is advised by Peter to the elders of the church when he writes to them about being willing shepherds of God’s flock,  eager to serve and not greedy for money. 1 Peter 5:2, W.O.B. pg 206  
  6. The others gave out of their wealth but the widow gave out of her poverty. Her giving was a matter of attitude; it was not the amount that mattered but that she gave ALL she had to live on. Luke 21:4; Guidelines for Giving, BibleGateway
  7. When we are concerned about the amount we give to the Church, to the poor or to a cause; what we give pales in comparison to what our Lord Jesus Christ gave to and for us. 2 Cor 8:9; 10 Essential Truths about Christian Giving, Ligon Duncan III, Crosswalk
  8. Money is the root of all evil is the misquoted statement of Paul who wrote to Timothy. Paul correctly stated the love of money is the root of all evil.  Money is the root of no evil, nor is it an evil of any kind. Its the love of it that brings the concern.   1 Tim 6:9-10; Clarke’s Commentary on 1 Timothy 6:10 
  9. Giving to the needy is not something that requires announcements, trumpets and fanfare. Matthew 6:2
  10. The lure of money can be quite enticing to all including Christians. It can block us from an intimate relationship with our Lord & Savior but Jesus reminds us in        Luke 16:13 “…You can not serve both God and Money”.

 

Resources

Women of the Bible: 52 Bible Studies for Individuals and Groups; Jean E Syswerda; Zondervan, 2002

NIV Study Bible; Zondervan

http://www.biblegateway.com/…/commentaries/; Guidelines for Giving, BibleGateway, IVP New Testament Commentaries

www.biblestudytools.com/bible…/christian-…; 10 Essential Truths about Christian Giving, Crosswalk: Bible Study Tools; Dr. J. Ligon Duncan III

http://www.godvine.com › Online Bible › 1 Timothy › 1 Timothy 6; Clarke’s Commentary