Bible Study Notes from The Gosple of John – Lesson One

 

Overview Summary of  Lesson One

Life Changes Series by NAVPRESS (1)

Who is John?

John describes himself only as “ the disciple whom Jesus loved.” (John 13:23 plus ft.nt., 19:26, 20:2; 21:7, 20; see also 21:24).

John was  the son of Zebedee, a Fisherman (Mark 1:19-20); his mother was Salome (Mark 15: 40, Matt. 27:56).  He was the brother of James (Matt. 4: 21-22).

He was prominent in the early church but is not mentioned by name in this Gospel—which would be natural if he wrote it, but hard to explain otherwise. (NIV pg. 2177)

The book for this study is outlined simply, to give us a tour of the book of John.  The author gives the students the time to slowly get use to the author and how he (John) writes and teaches us about the gift of eternal life Jesus offers to all who believe in Him.

The study guide has work book exercises. Some important workbook exercises for this lesson were:

Outlining JOHN – One of the important guides in understanding the Bible is to identify the author’s intent in writing the book. In this study, on page 11, the author asks the student to, as you initially read the book, make a broad outline of the book by giving a title to each chapter or themes within a chapter.  Pages 11 and 12 provide assistance with a chapter/verse guide of important sections.

Question 5 on page 12 – “What do you learn about John’s intent and purpose for writing John from 20:30-31? “Jesus did many other miraculous signs in the presence of his disciples, which are not recorded in this book. But these are written that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name.”

Four Gospels (page 14) – The group was given enough information to compare and contrast the gospel of John with the synoptic gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke by reading “Four Gospels” on pages 14-15.

  1. Life Change Series, JOHN, The Navigators, NavPress,1987
  2. Holy Bible: New International Version (NIV), Zondervan Corporation, 2002

 

 

 

 

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